How to choose your snorkelling spot 

Are you already a seasoned snorkeller, or just getting started? Here’s how to choose a spot where you can snorkel in complete safety.

How to choose your snorkelling spot
Safety when snorkelling with fins

Some useful tips on how to choose the right snorkelling spot 

If you want to learn how to snorkel with fins, then make sure you choose a suitable spot. The spot must be as safe as possible and well protected against the wind and currents. You should also take other potentially dangerous users into consideration (motor-driven vessels, wind surfers, spearfishermen, etc.). To feel perfectly safe, choose a spot that is supervised and readily accessible on foot, with nearby parking and equipment zones, etc. Beaches are ideal for getting into the water. Access is easy and you will not cause any harm to the natural environment. Bear this in mind!

Choosing your snorkelling spot 

The underwater topography must also be accessible. Ideally, the depth should vary between 2 and 5 metres for easy observation, so that you can enjoy the colours, without touching the floor with your fins. Does the site have varied relief? You should opt for predominantly sandy spots, or spots with a few rocks here and there. Avoid snorkelling in areas where the seabed is covered with seagrass. These long green leaves that sway in the waves can be worrisome for beginners! Also, make sure that the water is clear enough to allow for observation. As you become more confident, you can make more exciting discoveries by choosing spots with a rich biodiversity and different ecosystems. Always keep an eye on your exit route out of the water and start off snorkelling in spots where the relief of the land is not too uneven. You can always choose underwater trails. Whether snorkelling alone or with an instructor, these spots meet all the above-mentioned conditions.

Baptiste, Subea digital manager

Baptiste

Digital manager - padi rescue and level 1 ffessm

I'm Subea's Digital Manager. I'm passionate about spear fishing and free diving, and have been scuba diving for over fifteen years. I dive alone down to 60 meters.